Gallery

I love your weavings, Lynn - just don’t know where you get your ideas from - stunning.  —DS

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ROSENGÅNG (ROSEPATH) 1975

Wool from the Skye Wool Mill purchased on a trip home to Scotland from Sweden, dyed in the colours of native rocks & stones

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CALIFORNIA STORM 2009

Hand Painted & Natural Dyed Wool & Alpaca

What was the inspiration for this weaving? Read about my stormy Return to California


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GALWAY SHAWL

2m x 1m

Galway Shawl is a memory of soft stones, sunshine & rugged sea.

Woven with natural dyed wool and sparkling lurex t is a symbol of the enveloping warmth & comfort that women take from the work of their hands and pass on.

The West of Ireland and Me tells you more.


ON THE ROAD TO KING’S CAVES 2003

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30 cm x 50 cm

Natural Dyed Wool



Sea Changes 2003

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Handspun & Natural Dyed Shetland Wool, Silk

Moments in the movement of the sea on a day of shimmering sunlight and occasional wind. Blues & greens reflect the clarity of the sea on such a day with the white froth of a silken wave responding to the breeze.


SHORE PATTERNS 2007

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Handspun and Shetland Wool dyed with Madder and Lichen.

Silk and Cotton

Wooden Found Object a Gift from the Sea

“Shore Patterns” is the ripple where the sea meets the sand on a windy day.

Back from Iceland tells of a walk on the beach which inspired this weaving.

FORMERLY A LOBSTER POT 2008

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Natural Dyed Wool and White Silk, woven on a recycled lobster trap


Celtic Wedding

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White & Tussah Silk, Cochineal Dyed Wool & Driftwood

White & Tussah Silk contrast each other in this weaving in the way that male & female are contrasted in a relationship - luxuriously different in character but part of the same. The red lines are the bloodlines that marriage brings together. Celtic monks wore white in their “leine croiche” or tunics as do brides as a symbol of hope and joy.

1m / 1m

Stane Dyke 1 & 2

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1m/1m

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Handspun Shetland Wool in Natural Colours with Flax & Handspun Linen

Tradition comes together in these two weavings where natural materials pay tribute to the natural elements which shape our island and record our history.

Fields were cleared for cultivation by removing the stones and building them into boundary fences or dykes. These man-made structures define the landscape as much as the natural forms of rocks & mountains.

The yarns in the weavings are from the natural colours of the sheep which graze in the fields on Arran. They are also from flax. The process which turns the flax plant into linen has been practiced since antiquity. On Arran until recently it was an essential island industry providing much needed income to the parish economy.